Tagged tech tips

A tidy wiring diagram is a must.
17

How To Wire Driving/Fog Lights

Driving lights and fog lights came about as car owners navigated the twisting turning by-ways of misty England. Powerful lighting was necessary to illuminate the road ahead for potential hazards to be successfully identified and avoided. In addition, foggy and wet conditions caused by road spray obliterated the edges of poorly crowned roads. There is…

Supercharged!: Installing the New Moss Triumph TR6 Supercharger System

Regular British Motoring readers know that over that last few years, Moss Motors has been at the forefront of a new trend: retrofitting British classics with upgraded performance and technology. Modern overdrive transmissions, tubeshock conversions, electronic fuel injection systems, and a variety of supercharger kits have reinvigorated and revolutionized the sports car hobby. Classic car…

Tech Tips: Winter 1999

A lady took her car into a large garage for a minor tune-up. She was informed that one of the spark plugs had stripped the threads in the head. The garage installed a Heli-coil and four new plugs. The charge? $12 for four plugs and $4 for the insert, plus of course, $170 for labor!…

Tech Tips: Fall 1999

I bought my 1980 MGB a year ago from a very honest guy who was open to showing me all the problems as well as the good points of the car. He informed me that all of the light bulbs had been tested and replaced, but the turn signals still didn’t work! After buying the…

Tech Tips: Summer 1999

On the subject of HIF4 carburetor conversions to late MGBs, if you cut the insulator blocks in half to clear the brake power booster, you will find that you also have to cut two notches in the heat shield to compensate for the movement of the throttle shaft. The insulator blocks have a thickness of 1…

Tech Tips: Spring 1999

My tip concerns the removal of stuck pistons from brake cylinders. Air pressure usually works, but then you spend the rest of the afternoon looking for the parts on the floor! I have taken some old brake line nuts and drilled them out then tapped them to take grease fittings. Now, with a grease gun,…

Technical Knowledge

I have driven my 1966 TR4A for many years with nothing but the bare minimum in maintenance. Recently, I decided to park it for a couple of months and commence on some repairs I had been putting off. First choice was the horn, which had not worked In several years! With an inexpensive voltmeter, it…

Tech Tips: Fall 1998

Are you having trouble installing your new seat diaphragm to an assembled seat? Try this: modify a large (preferably old) screwdriver by cutting a slot in the blade to accept the diaphragm hook. This is then used to force the side hooks into place. On my TR6, it was preferable to turn the front and back…

Tech Tips: Summer 1998

Here’s a time-saving and cheap idea that is sure to help out any British car owner when working in his/her garage. Simply save an egg carton and use it as a separator/part holder to hold small parts and keep them organized. There is no cheaper container with as many compartments! Also I use a soft-bristled…

Tech Tips: Spring 1998

IT’S THE REAL THING! As the owner of a 1966 TR4A that is in ongoing therapy and restoration, I have encountered many rusted and “lightened for life” nuts, bolts, and fittings which no amount of liquid wrench or lubricating oils were able to cope with. Working for a major airline, I often have discussions with…

© Copyright 2016 Moss Motors, Ltd. All Rights Reserved.